People with intellectual or developmental disabilities face big gap in health care services

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The latest numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention find autism and developmental disabilities on the rise.Top Stories:Reidsville investigators seeking 164 felony and misdemeanor indictments against owners and employees of gaming location 2 injured after vehicle crashes into Winston-Salem pond, fire department saysInterstate 74 East closed after tractor-trailer overturns, fire crews sayGet the latest news stories of interest by clicking here A doctor who specializes in this field said people who have IDD, meaning intellectual or developmental disabilities, face a serious gap in health care services.The gap is in the lack of training. Medical students spend years training to become doctors, but Dr. Craig Escude said there’s no mandated curriculum on how to spot or communicate with people who are intellectually or developmentally disabled.Keep up with the latest news and weather by downloading the WXII app here. “The first thing is awareness, including awareness of health care providers about the need to learn about health care for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities,” Escude said.Escude said health care education hasn’t caught up with the rising numbers of IDD diagnoses.According to the CDC, 1 in 36 children are now diagnosed with autism. One in 6 children are now diagnosed with a developmental disability.Escude said when health care providers don’t recognize changes in their patient’s behavior, early signs of trouble are often missed.Watch: NOWCAST streaming newscasts “This is a term called diagnostic overshadowing, where early signs and symptoms of something are just attributed to the person’s overall condition, such as their intellectual disability. Rather than looking for a treatable underlying condition.” Escude said.He said the problem is that medical schools don’t include training on how to identify or communicate with patients who are intellectually or developmentally disabled.Escude said, “I can speak from my own personal experience as a family physician. I had no training in medical school or residency about how to provide good health care for people with IDD.”NAVIGATE: Home | Weather | Watch NOWCAST TV | Local News | National | News We Love |Escude said studies show many clinicians feel uncomfortable and incapable of providing the same level of health care for people with disabilities, as those without disabilities.Trending Stories:

The latest numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention find autism and developmental disabilities on the rise.

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A doctor who specializes in this field said people who have IDD, meaning intellectual or developmental disabilities, face a serious gap in health care services.

The gap is in the lack of training.

Medical students spend years training to become doctors, but Dr. Craig Escude said there’s no mandated curriculum on how to spot or communicate with people who are intellectually or developmentally disabled.

Keep up with the latest news and weather by downloading the WXII app here.

“The first thing is awareness, including awareness of health care providers about the need to learn about health care for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities,” Escude said.

Escude said health care education hasn’t caught up with the rising numbers of IDD diagnoses.

According to the CDC, 1 in 36 children are now diagnosed with autism. One in 6 children are now diagnosed with a developmental disability.

Escude said when health care providers don’t recognize changes in their patient’s behavior, early signs of trouble are often missed.

Watch: NOWCAST streaming newscasts

“This is a term called diagnostic overshadowing, where early signs and symptoms of something are just attributed to the person’s overall condition, such as their intellectual disability. Rather than looking for a treatable underlying condition.” Escude said.

He said the problem is that medical schools don’t include training on how to identify or communicate with patients who are intellectually or developmentally disabled.

Escude said, “I can speak from my own personal experience as a family physician. I had no training in medical school or residency about how to provide good health care for people with IDD.”

NAVIGATE: Home |Weather |Watch NOWCAST TV |Local News |National |News We Love |

Escude said studies show many clinicians feel uncomfortable and incapable of providing the same level of health care for people with disabilities, as those without disabilities.

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